Reapers

Reapers

Chrishall Reapers: Amos Pitches, Walter Webb, Timothy Harvey, Charlie Banks, Alfred Walters, Billy Barnes, Albert Reed, Fred Reed. This team was swanging charlock.  To ‘swange’ (pronounced swonj) was to cut off the flowers of the weed before they seeded....
Haymakers with hoops

Haymakers with hoops

The Haymakers. The willow hoops on the end of the scythes helped to control how the hay fell once cut. From left to right: William Revell   Amos Pitches    William Cranwell    Albert Drury    Leonard Flack    Herbert Flack...
Working the fields the old way

Working the fields the old way

Looking towards New Farm, Chrishall from Chiswick Hall, these men are hoeing out the weeds. Two individuals appear to be left handed.  Notice the lack of trees and hedging along the main road which means you can see New Farm very clearly.
Haymakers

Haymakers

Workmen pictured at Reservoir Hall Lane, Great Chishill c 1935. Tim Harvey is in the front row with the pipe and back row left to right are believed to be Ron Reed & Chummy Harvey. Karen Rogers of South Wales writes (July 2010): “I’m descended from...
Home Guard

Home Guard

In WWII everyone in the village was involved in the war effort whether it was making jam or manning the Observation Post at the top of the village, this important duty being carried out by the Home Guard.  The full Platoon and Chrishall Division can be seen below, and...
Drage & Kent’s “Gyro Tiller”

Drage & Kent’s “Gyro Tiller”

This incredible beast of a machine was also known as a Diesel Rotary Plough and was made by Fowler of Leeds, who were better known for the manufacture of steam locomotives and traction engines. It was a real monster and was used for breaking up the heavy clay Essex...

Traction Engines: Arthur Cane

These photos were taken on the 1st May 1928. Arthur Cane (born 1904?) worked for Drage & Kent of Chrishall working with the steam plough teams. Two engines, one at each end of the field would pull the plough by a cable turned by an horizontal cable drum under the...
Traction Engine at Builden End

Traction Engine at Builden End

This carefully posed photograph is nonetheless delightful and shows the degree of labour once employed locally, for there are 14 individuals in view. Note the high chimney stack of the engine to minimise the risk of straw fires. This is believed to be in Builden...